Book: Mary McLeod Bethune


A biography in documents of one of America's most influential black women. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.

  • Author : Mary McLeod Bethune
  • Publisher : Indiana University Press
  • Release : 06 May 2021
  • Category: Social Science
  • Pages : 317
  • ISBN 13 : 025321503X

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Book Mary McLeod Bethune
Score: 5
From 2 Ratings

Mary McLeod Bethune Book Summary :

A biography in documents of one of America's most influential black women. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.

Book: We Return Fighting


Enhanced with illustrations, this book provides a look a the many people and diverse organizations that played a role in the battle for civil rights for African Americans during the 1950s and 1960s.

  • Author : Mark Robert Schneider
  • Publisher : UPNE
  • Release : 06 May 2021
  • Category: History
  • Pages : 476
  • ISBN 13 : 1555534902

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Book We Return Fighting

We Return Fighting Book Summary :

Enhanced with illustrations, this book provides a look a the many people and diverse organizations that played a role in the battle for civil rights for African Americans during the 1950s and 1960s.

Book: Walter White


A portrait of the influential secretary of the NAACP explores his dedication to advancing civil rights in America, tracing his role in ending lynching, creating the legal strategy that led to Brown v.

  • Author : Thomas Dyja
  • Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
  • Release : 01 October 2008
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 212
  • ISBN 13 : 9781566637664

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Book Walter White

Walter White Book Summary :

A portrait of the influential secretary of the NAACP explores his dedication to advancing civil rights in America, tracing his role in ending lynching, creating the legal strategy that led to Brown v. Board of Education, and hosting a premier salon for the Harlem Renaissance.

Book: God Harlem U S A


In addition to the fascinating biography, this is solid social and intellectual history as well."—American Academy of Religion This book traces the life and ministry of Father Divine and, in the author's opinion, correctly places him in ...

  • Author : Jill Watts
  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Release : 13 February 1995
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 249
  • ISBN 13 : 9780520201729

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Book God  Harlem U S A

God Harlem U S A Book Summary :

"Unearthing rare, scarce, and previously unknown original sources, Watts spells out a comprehensive, even definitive account of Father's controversial life and charismatic ministry. In addition to the fascinating biography, this is solid social and intellectual history as well."—American Academy of Religion

Book: Walking with Presidents


This is just one example of the remarkable influence Louis Martin had on national politics for more than four decades. Now, for the first time, the story of Louis Martin's life is told.

  • Author : Alex Poinsett
  • Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
  • Release : 06 May 2021
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 251
  • ISBN 13 : 084769741X

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Book Walking with Presidents

Walking with Presidents Book Summary :

In the last weeks of the 1960 presidential race, Louis Martin pulled off a minor miracle. With two days to go before the election, this passionate civil rights advocate and Democratic activists put two million pamphlets into the hands of black voters across America, informing them of Senator John F. Kennedy's sympathetic phone call to Martin Luther King, Jr., then languishing in a Georgia prison. The center of gravity in black partisan support shifted, and Kennedy won by a hair. This is just one example of the remarkable influence Louis Martin had on national politics for more than four decades. Now, for the first time, the story of Louis Martin's life is told. Walking with Presidents traces the career of an African American who rose from crusading journalist to preeminent presidential advisor and civil rights liason in the Kennedy, Johnson, and Carter administrations. Martin was the consummate insider, unconcerned about who got credit for his work so long as he could advance his mission--bringing African Americans into the political mainstream.

Book: Mary McLeod Bethune in Washington D C


In this loving biography, historian Ida E. Jones explores the monumental life of Mary McLeod Bethune as a leader, a crusader, and a Washingtonian.

  • Author : Ida E. Jones
  • Publisher : Arcadia Publishing
  • Release : 04 June 2013
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 236
  • ISBN 13 : 9781625840844

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Book Mary McLeod Bethune in Washington  D C

Mary McLeod Bethune in Washington D C Book Summary :

The civil rights leader’s life and work in the nation’s capital, and her influence around the world, are celebrated in this biography. Best known as an educator and early civil rights activist, Mary McLeod Bethune was the daughter of formerly enslaved people. After moving to Washington, D.C., in 1936, she founded the National Council of Negro Women, an organization that supported Black women through numerous educational and community-based programs. Bethune also led the charge to change the segregationist policies of local hospitals and concert halls, and she acted as a mentor to countless African American women in the District. In this loving biography, historian Ida E. Jones explores the monumental life of Mary McLeod Bethune as a leader, a crusader, and a Washingtonian.

Book: Black Culture and the New Deal Large Print 16pt


With numerous illustrations, Black Culture and the New Deal offers a fresh perspective on the New Deal's racial progressivism and provides a new framework for understanding black culture and politics in the Roosevelt era.

  • Author : Sklaroff
  • Publisher : ReadHowYouWant.com
  • Release : 01 July 2010
  • Category: History
  • Pages : 592
  • ISBN 13 : 9781458782328

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Book Black Culture and the New Deal  Large Print 16pt

Black Culture and the New Deal Large Print 16pt Book Summary :

In the 1930s, the Roosevelt administration--unwilling to antagonize a powerful southern congressional bloc--refused to endorse legislation that openly sought to improve political, economic, and social conditions for African Americans. Instead, as historian Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff shows, the administration recognized and celebrated African Americans by offering federal support to notable black intellectuals, celebrities, and artists. Sklaroff illustrates how programs within the Federal Arts Projects and several war agencies gave voice to such notable African Americans as Lena Horne, Joe Louis, Duke Ellington, and Richard Wright, as well as lesser-known figures. She argues that these New Deal programs represent a key moment in the history of American race relations, as the cultural arena provided black men and women with unique employment opportunities and new outlets for political expression. Equally important, she contends that these cultural programs were not merely an attempt to appease a black constituency but were also part of the New Deal's larger goal of promoting a multiracial nation. Yet, while federal projects ushered in creativity and unprecedented possibilities, they were also subject to censorship, bigotry, and political machinations. With numerous illustrations, Black Culture and the New Deal offers a fresh perspective on the New Deal's racial progressivism and provides a new framework for understanding black culture and politics in the Roosevelt era.

Book: The Black Cabinet


Ralph Bunche, Walter White of the NAACP, A. Philip Randolph, and others are part of the story as well. But the Black Cabinet was never officially recognized by FDR, and with the demise of the New Deal, it disappeared from history.

  • Author : Jill Watts
  • Publisher : Atlantic Monthly Press
  • Release : 12 May 2020
  • Category: History
  • Pages :
  • ISBN 13 : 9780802146922

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Book The Black Cabinet

The Black Cabinet Book Summary :

A magnificently researched, dramatically told work of narrative nonfiction about the history, evolution, impact, and ultimate demise of what was known in the 1930s and 1940s as President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Black Cabinet. In the early 20th century, most African Americans still lived in the South, disenfranchised, impoverished, terrorized by white violence, and denied the basic rights of citizenship. As the Democrats swept into the White House on a wave of black defectors from the Party of Lincoln, a group of African American intellectuals—legal minds, social scientists, media folk—sought to get the community’s needs on the table. This would become the Black Cabinet, a group of African American racial affairs experts working throughout the New Deal, forming an unofficial advisory council to lobby the President. But with the white Southern vote so important to the fortunes of the Party, the path would be far from smooth. Most prominent in the Black Cabinet were Mary McLeod Bethune, an educator close to Eleanor Roosevelt, and her “boys”: Robert Weaver, a Harvard-educated economist who pioneered enforcement standards for federal anti-discrimination guidelines (and, years later, the first African American Cabinet secretary); Bill Hastie, a lawyer who would become a federal appellate judge; Al Smith, head of the largest black jobs program in the New Deal at the WPA; and Robert Vann, a newspaper publisher whose unstinting reporting on the administration’s shortcomings would keep his erstwhile colleagues honest. Ralph Bunche, Walter White of the NAACP, A. Philip Randolph, and others are part of the story as well. But the Black Cabinet was never officially recognized by FDR, and with the demise of the New Deal, it disappeared from history. Jill Watts’s The Black Cabinet is a dramatic full-scale examination of a forgotten moment that speaks directly to our own.

Book: African American Firsts


Offers a look at African-Americans who achieved major firsts in such areas as journalism, entertainment, the military, history, and politics, noting the dates of each event.

  • Author : Joan Potter
  • Publisher : Dafina Books
  • Release : 06 May 2021
  • Category: Social Science
  • Pages : 458
  • ISBN 13 : 9780758241665

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Book African American Firsts
Score: 4
From 8 Ratings

African American Firsts Book Summary :

Offers a look at African-Americans who achieved major firsts in such areas as journalism, entertainment, the military, history, and politics, noting the dates of each event.

Book: The Black History of the White House


This book would be a great addition to many courses in history, sociology, or ethnic studies courses.

  • Author : Clarence Lusane
  • Publisher : City Lights Books
  • Release : 23 January 2013
  • Category: History
  • Pages : 544
  • ISBN 13 : 9780872866119

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Book The Black History of the White House
Score: 4.5
From 2 Ratings

The Black History of the White House Book Summary :

The Black History of the White House presents the untold history, racial politics, and shifting significance of the White House as experienced by African Americans, from the generations of enslaved people who helped to build it or were forced to work there to its first black First Family, the Obamas. Clarence Lusane juxtaposes significant events in White House history with the ongoing struggle for democratic, civil, and human rights by black Americans and demonstrates that only during crises have presidents used their authority to advance racial justice. He describes how in 1901 the building was officially named the “White House” amidst a furious backlash against President Roosevelt for inviting Booker T. Washington to dinner, and how that same year that saw the consolidation of white power with the departure of the last black Congressmember elected after the Civil War. Lusane explores how, from its construction in 1792 to its becoming the home of the first black president, the White House has been a prism through which to view the progress and struggles of black Americans seeking full citizenship and justice. “Clarence Lusane is one of America’s most thoughtful and critical thinkers on issues of race, class and power.”—Manning Marable "Barack Obama may be the first black president in the White House, but he's far from the first black person to work in it. In this fascinating history of all the enslaved people, workers and entertainers who spent time in the president's official residence over the years, Clarence Lusane restores the White House to its true colors."—Barbara Ehrenreich "Reading The Black History of the White House shows us how much we DON'T know about our history, politics, and culture. In a very accessible and polished style, Clarence Lusane takes us inside the key national events of the American past and present. He reveals new dimensions of the black presence in the US from revolutionary days to the Obama campaign. Yes, 'black hands bu

Book: Hattie McDaniel


Hattie McDaniel is best known for her performance as Mammy, the sassy foil to Scarlett O'Hara in Gone with the Wind.

  • Author : Jill Watts
  • Publisher : Harper Collins
  • Release : 06 February 2007
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 384
  • ISBN 13 : 9780060514914

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Hattie McDaniel Book Summary :

Hattie McDaniel is best known for her performance as Mammy, the sassy foil to Scarlett O'Hara in Gone with the Wind. Though the role called for yet another wide–grinned, subservient black domestic, McDaniel transformed her character into one who was loyal yet subversive, devoted yet bossy. Her powerful performance would win her the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress and catapult the hopes of Black Hollywood that the entertainment industry ––after decades of stereotypical characters–– was finally ready to write more multidimensional, fully realized roles for blacks. But racism was so entrenched in Hollywood that despite pleas by organizations such as the NAACP and SAG ––and the very examples that Black service men were setting as they fought against Hitler in WWII–– roles for blacks continued to denigrate the African American experience. So rather than see her stature increase in Hollywood, as did other Oscar–winning actresses, Hattie McDaniel, continued to play servants. And rather than see her popularity increase, her audience turned against her as an increasingly politicized black community criticized her and her peers for accepting degrading roles. "I'd rather play a maid then be a maid," Hattie McDaniel answered her critics but her flip response belied a woman who was herself emotionally conflicted about the roles she accepted but who tried to imbue each Mammy character with dignity and nuance.