Book: Separated by Their Sex


Colonial women incorporated the novel ideas into their self-conceptions; during such "private" activities as sitting around a table drinking tea, they worked to define their own lives.

  • Author : Mary Beth Norton
  • Publisher : Cornell University Press
  • Release : 16 May 2011
  • Category: History
  • Pages : 272
  • ISBN 13 : 0801461375

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Book Separated by Their Sex

Separated by Their Sex Book Summary :

In Separated by Their Sex, Mary Beth Norton offers a bold genealogy that shows how gender came to determine the right of access to the Anglo-American public sphere by the middle of the eighteenth century. Earlier, high-status men and women alike had been recognized as appropriate political actors, as exemplified during and after Bacon’s Rebellion by the actions of—and reactions to—Lady Frances Berkeley, wife of Virginia’s governor. By contrast, when the first ordinary English women to claim a political voice directed group petitions to Parliament during the Civil War of the 1640s, men relentlessly criticized and parodied their efforts. Even so, as late as 1690, Anglo-American women’s political interests and opinions were publicly acknowledged. Norton traces the profound shift in attitudes toward women’s participation in public affairs to the age’s cultural arbiters, including John Dunton, editor of the Athenian Mercury, a popular 1690s periodical that promoted women’s links to husband, family, and household. Fittingly, Dunton was the first author known to apply the word "private" to women and their domestic lives. Subsequently, the immensely influential authors Richard Steele and Joseph Addison (in the Tatler and the Spectator) advanced the notion that women’s participation in politics—even in political dialogues—was absurd. They and many imitators on both sides of the Atlantic argued that women should confine themselves to home and family, a position that American women themselves had adopted by the 1760s. Colonial women incorporated the novel ideas into their self-conceptions; during such "private" activities as sitting around a table drinking tea, they worked to define their own lives. On the cusp of the American Revolution, Norton concludes, a newly gendered public-private division was firmly in place.

Book: Founding Mothers Fathers


Much like A Midwife's Tale and The Unredeemed Captive, this novel is about power relationships in early American society, religion, and politics--with insights into the initial development and operation of government, the maintenance of ...

  • Author : Mary Beth Norton
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Release : 03 August 2011
  • Category: History
  • Pages : 512
  • ISBN 13 : 9780307760760

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Book Founding Mothers   Fathers

Founding Mothers Fathers Book Summary :

Much like A Midwife's Tale and The Unredeemed Captive, this novel is about power relationships in early American society, religion, and politics--with insights into the initial development and operation of government, the maintenance of social order, and the experiences of individual men and women.

Book: The American Revolution 1774 1783


Daniel Marston argues that this belief, though widespread, is a misconception.

  • Author : Daniel Marston
  • Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
  • Release : 06 June 2014
  • Category: History
  • Pages : 96
  • ISBN 13 : 9781472810113

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Book The American Revolution 1774   1783

The American Revolution 1774 1783 Book Summary :

The American Revolution has been characterized politically as a united political uprising of the American colonies and militarily as a guerrilla campaign of colonists against the inflexible British military establishment. Daniel Marston argues that this belief, though widespread, is a misconception. He contends that the American Revolution, in reality, created deep political divisions in the population of the Thirteen Colonies, while militarily pitting veterans of the Seven Years' War against one another, in a conflict that combined guerrilla tactics and classic eighteenth century campaign techniques on both sides. The peace treaty of 1783 that brought an end to the war marked the formal beginning of the United States of America as an independent political entity.

Book: 1775


An unconventional assessment of the American Revolution examines the events, politics, economic factors, and military preparations of 1775 that ignited the war and established patriot control over American governance and key territories.

  • Author : Kevin Phillips
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Release : 24 September 2013
  • Category: History
  • Pages : 628
  • ISBN 13 : 9780143123996

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Book 1775
Score: 3
From 2 Ratings

1775 Book Summary :

An unconventional assessment of the American Revolution examines the events, politics, economic factors, and military preparations of 1775 that ignited the war and established patriot control over American governance and key territories.

Book: Friends Divided


Gordon Wood has more than done justice to these entwined lives and their meaning; he has written a magnificent new addition to America's collective story.

  • Author : Gordon S. Wood
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Release : 09 May 2021
  • Category: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
  • Pages : 502
  • ISBN 13 : 9780735224711

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Book Friends Divided
Score: 3
From 1 Ratings

Friends Divided Book Summary :

Arguably no relationship in this country's history carries as much freight as that of John Adams of Massachusetts and Thomas Jefferson of Virginia. Gordon Wood has more than done justice to these entwined lives and their meaning; he has written a magnificent new addition to America's collective story.

Book: 1774


From one of our most acclaimed and original colonial historians, a groundbreaking book--the first to look at the critical "long year" of 1774 and the revolutionary change that took place from December 1773 to mid-April 1775, from the Boston ...

  • Author : Mary Beth Norton
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Release : 09 February 2021
  • Category: Uncategorized
  • Pages : 528
  • ISBN 13 : 9780804172462

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Book 1774

1774 Book Summary :

From one of our most acclaimed and original colonial historians, a groundbreaking book--the first to look at the critical "long year" of 1774 and the revolutionary change that took place from December 1773 to mid-April 1775, from the Boston Tea Party and the First Continental Congress to the Battles of Lexington and Concord. A WALL STREET JOURNAL BEST BOOK OF 2020 Mary Beth Norton keenly focuses on the sixteen months during which the traditional loyalists to King George III began their discordant "discussions" that led to their acceptance of the inevitability of war against the British Empire and to the clashes at Lexington and Concord in mid-April 1775. Drawing extensively on pamphlets, newspapers, and personal correspondence, Norton reconstructs colonial political discourse as it happened, showing the vigorous campaign mounted by conservatives criticizing congressional actions. But by then it was too late. In early 1775, governors throughout the colonies informed colonial officials in London that they were unable to thwart the increasing power of the committees and their allied provincial congresses. Although the Declaration of Independence would not be formally adopted until July 1776, Americans, even before the outbreak of war in April 1775, had in effect "declared independence" by obeying the decrees of their new provincial governments rather than colonial officials.

Book: The Citizenship Revolution


So ended the first great phase of the American citizenship revolution: a continuing struggle to reconcile the promise of revolutionary equality with the pressing and sometimes competing demands of law, order, and the pursuit of happiness.

  • Author : Douglas Bradburn
  • Publisher : University of Virginia Press
  • Release : 13 July 2009
  • Category: History
  • Pages : 432
  • ISBN 13 : 9780813930312

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Book The Citizenship Revolution

The Citizenship Revolution Book Summary :

Most Americans believe that the ratification of the Constitution in 1788 marked the settlement of post-Revolutionary disputes over the meanings of rights, democracy, and sovereignty in the new nation. In The Citizenship Revolution, Douglas Bradburn undercuts this view by showing that the Union, not the Nation, was the most important product of independence. In 1774, everyone in British North America was a subject of King George and Parliament. In 1776 a number of newly independent "states," composed of "American citizens" began cobbling together a Union to fight their former fellow countrymen. But who was an American? What did it mean to be a "citizen" and not a "subject"? And why did it matter? Bradburn’s stunning reinterpretation requires us to rethink the traditional chronologies and stories of the American Revolutionary experience. He places battles over the meaning of "citizenship" in law and in politics at the center of the narrative. He shows that the new political community ultimately discovered that it was not really a "Nation," but a "Union of States"—and that it was the states that set the boundaries of belonging and the very character of rights, for citizens and everyone else. To those inclined to believe that the ratification of the Constitution assured the importance of national authority and law in the lives of American people, the emphasis on the significance and power of the states as the arbiter of American rights and the character of nationhood may seem strange. But, as Bradburn argues, state control of the ultimate meaning of American citizenship represented the first stable outcome of the crisis of authority, allegiance, and identity that had exploded in the American Revolution—a political settlement delicately reached in the first years of the nineteenth century. So ended the first great phase of the American citizenship revolution: a continuing struggle to reconcile the promise of revolutionary equality with the pressing and sometimes co

Book: The Will of the People


T. H. Breen introduces us to the ordinary men and women who took responsibility for the course of the American revolution.

  • Author : T. H. Breen
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release : 17 September 2019
  • Category: History
  • Pages : 240
  • ISBN 13 : 9780674242067

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Book The Will of the People

The Will of the People Book Summary :

T. H. Breen introduces us to the ordinary men and women who took responsibility for the course of the American revolution. Far from the actions of the Continental Congress and the Continental Army, they took the reins of power and preserved a political culture based on the rule of law, creating America’s political identity in the process.

Book: Jamaica in the Age of Revolution


"The book focuses on the history of Jamaica during the years between Tacky's Revolt, the American Revolution, and the beginnings of parliamentary abolitionist legislation in 1788"--

  • Author : Trevor Burnard
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 09 May 2021
  • Category: Jamaica
  • Pages : 400
  • ISBN 13 : 9780812251920

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Book Jamaica in the Age of Revolution

Jamaica in the Age of Revolution Book Summary :

"The book focuses on the history of Jamaica during the years between Tacky's Revolt, the American Revolution, and the beginnings of parliamentary abolitionist legislation in 1788"--

Book: In the Devil s Snare


Award-winning historian Mary Beth Norton reexamines the Salem witch trials in this startlingly original, meticulously researched, and utterly riveting study.

  • Author : Mary Beth Norton
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Release : 18 December 2007
  • Category: History
  • Pages : 448
  • ISBN 13 : 9780307426369

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Book In the Devil s Snare
Score: 3
From 12 Ratings

In the Devil s Snare Book Summary :

Award-winning historian Mary Beth Norton reexamines the Salem witch trials in this startlingly original, meticulously researched, and utterly riveting study. In 1692 the people of Massachusetts were living in fear, and not solely of satanic afflictions. Horrifyingly violent Indian attacks had all but emptied the northern frontier of settlers, and many traumatized refugees—including the main accusers of witches—had fled to communities like Salem. Meanwhile the colony’s leaders, defensive about their own failure to protect the frontier, pondered how God’s people could be suffering at the hands of savages. Struck by the similarities between what the refugees had witnessed and what the witchcraft “victims” described, many were quick to see a vast conspiracy of the Devil (in league with the French and the Indians) threatening New England on all sides. By providing this essential context to the famous events, and by casting her net well beyond the borders of Salem itself, Norton sheds new light on one of the most perplexing and fascinating periods in our history.

Book: The Spirit of 74


How ordinary people went from resistance to revolution: “[A] concise, lively narrative . . . the authors expertly build tension.” —Publishers Weekly Americans know about the Boston Tea Party and “the shot heard ’round the world ...

  • Author : Ray Raphael
  • Publisher : New Press, The
  • Release : 25 August 2015
  • Category: History
  • Pages : 306
  • ISBN 13 : 9781620971277

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Book The Spirit of  74

The Spirit of 74 Book Summary :

How ordinary people went from resistance to revolution: “[A] concise, lively narrative . . . the authors expertly build tension.” —Publishers Weekly Americans know about the Boston Tea Party and “the shot heard ’round the world,” but sixteen months divided these two iconic events, a period that has nearly been lost to history. The Spirit of ’74 fills in this gap in our nation’s founding narrative, showing how in these mislaid months, step by step, real people made a revolution. After the Tea Party, Parliament not only shut down a port but also revoked the sacred Massachusetts charter. Completely disenfranchised, citizens rose up as a body and cast off British rule everywhere except in Boston, where British forces were stationed. A “Spirit of ’74” initiated the American Revolution, much as the better-known “Spirit of ’76” sparked independence. Redcoats marched on Lexington and Concord to take back a lost province, but they encountered Massachusetts militiamen who had trained for months to protect the revolution they had already made. The Spirit of ’74 places our founding moment in a rich new historical context, both changing and deepening its meaning for all Americans.